SOIL PROFILES OF THE POUILLY SUR LOIRE VINEYARDS
MARLS
Soil representative of the marls with small oysters zone
This soil type covers around 30% of the AOC surface area

MARLS
Roots
Roots located on the face of blocky structure aggregates
Dark-grey clayey marl with small oyster shell deposits
Hard grey marl with coarse blocky structure flow
Grey marl
Dark-grey clayey shale with small oyster shells
Very thin clayey limestone layer with small oyster shell deposits

Barely evolved clayey sodium-calcium

This soil type is based on dark-grey marl, very clayey and plastic, and light-grey marl, more crumbly and with a coarse parallelepipedic flow. These marls alternate in a succession of layers many tens of metres thick.

This soil is characterised by a yellowish-brown colour, clayey texture, a well-defined angular block structure, basic pH and good porosity. Its agronomic properties include high mineral-retaining capacity, a large water reserve for use by the plant (RU160* = 210 mm) and a good, stable soil structure. To acquire its water, the vine develops an extensive root system in depth (over 160 cm deep) but localized at the faces of the aggregates in the soil.

(*) RU 160: usable water reserve for plants rooted up to 160 cm deep



BARROIS LIMESTONE
Soil representative of the Barrois limestones.
This soil type covers around 25% of the AOC surface area.

BARROIS LIMESTONE
Fine compacted limestone
Totally disintegrated, clayey limestone with small oyster shell deposits
Very altered limestone marl
Micritic limestone

Pebbly sodium-calcium

This soil type is made up of limestone and limestone marl. The upper layers (between 0 and 40 cm deep) were formed from the alteration of fine, compact limestone and the total disintegration of a thin layer of clayey limestone with small oyster shell deposits. The lower layers come from highly altered, greyish limestone marl. A micritic limestone layer is found at 140 cm deep.

This soil is characterised by its yellowish-brown colour, clayey texture, high coarse limestone content in the upper layers, a well-defined sub-angular block structure, low pH and excellent porosity. Its performance is marked by its excellent mineral-retention capacity, average water reserve for use by the plant (RU140* = 135 mm) and rapid infiltration of rainwater into the subsoil. The vine root system prefers to establish itself in the upper soil layers (between 0 and 60 cm deep), as the lower layers tend to dry out and have fewer nutrients.

(*) RU 140: usable water reserve for plants rooted up to 140 cm deep.


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